The shape of things to come

Mrs S and I were talking over lunch the other day. She’s finally giving up the day job this year and being totally freelance, doing her own thing, doing creative production of real goods. Her comment on the transition; “I don’t know whether to cry or scream with joy.”

I know how she feels. When I made the transition from employee to freelancer I was very ambivalent about the whole process. The transition was tricky but not traumatic as I stepped out of my comfort zone into the great wide blue yonder of self-employment. I recall that getting away from the 9-5 felt really good after the first few months. Not being a wage slave was hard work but not so much of a chore as being ‘managed’, which I always hated. Show me a job and let me get on with it has long been my philosophy. Stand over me with a stopwatch and I’ll be so busy looking over my shoulder that I won’t do a good job.

On the home front, my raised beds are all showing signs of germination, and the ‘fast salad’ stuff I put in last week is going gangbusters, as are the spring onions, leeks, white cabbage and beetroot. My tomatoes and peppers are beginning to poke tiny leaves out of the soil, as are the cucumbers. The bees have settled in nicely and have already filled their brood boxes and one ‘super’ before starting work on the upper super (as in cropping) frames.

It’s been a bit of a delayed spring and summer this year, despite all the wavy hand predictions of heat death and climate doom. I put it down to increased particulates in the atmosphere from several large volcanic eruptions around the planet, and Ireland has always been a bit like Wales and western Scotland, a buffer for the British Isles from all the Atlantic weather. So getting my seeds in a month later than planned hasn’t worked out badly. At least as far as germination is concerned.

At this rate I should have salads for the summer by the end of July and a full crop of honey by early August. It may even be a good idea to buy a couple of new hives to act as bee traps If I miss a swarm. Then I have to invest in some honey processing gear. No matter, better to invest the money now than see it disappear in the coming waves of inflation.

Marketing game plan is to give out sample jars of raw organic honey to our neighbours for taste testing and to sell at the farmers market, when it finally gets going again. Another bright spot is that one of the local stores has expressed an interest. So I have a tacit agreement that at least one local outlet will try my product.

Mrs S will be handling the wax products side of things, but we’ve also been talking about supplying bee venom and propolis (Bee glue) for cosmetics and pharmaceutical use on a small scale.

We’re doing this because we don’t want to rely on pensions alone (Even though we have been very careful to plan for our frail dotage). The value of a pension can be reduced to worthlessness by politicians cocking everything up (as usual). And I have no intention of starving.

Why? I look at it this way. We live in an age where the old biblical quotation “Put not thy faith in Princes” is ever more appropriate. The politicians have given themselves godlike powers to intervene in people’s private lives but seem determined to reinforce another old saying about idols having feet of clay. Or should that quotation read “Yeah, but those eejits all have feet of clay.” and brains of lard to boot. In their desperate search for votes the political class pander to vociferous urban minorities and in doing so neglect the care of the majority. That’s even without the malign anti-human influence of organisations like the WEF.

If, and I’m not holding out much hope here, the powers that be don’t parlay us all into a global war, we will have built a bolt hole for the rest of our clan, with enough food to eat and a little left over to barter. If the worst case scenario doesn’t happen and the can gets kicked a little further along the road we’ll be quids in.

If the politicians keep on following the road of sanctioning everything vaguely Russian, then we’ll all be screwed. See one American commentators well argued points below.

Hunker down and grow your own folks, because Green policies are giving us all the shaft.

7 thoughts on “The shape of things to come”

  1. Good long term thinking. And give the kids somewhere to run to if and when they need it.
    That was my plan, although so far only one of them has taken me up on the offer.

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          1. Glad to hear that. Treat wasps nicely and they will ignore you. No fear, that’s my motto now.

            Anyway, wasps do control pests. They do go for our plums which is frustrating though. They tend to nibble one and then go onto another.

            We had a wasp nest in our compost heap. A great big hole as it were, quite fascinating.

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