Travel tribulations

Ireland just went to “Is your journey really necessary” restrictions to which my answer will always be “Yes.” The Gardai (Police) are requesting definitive guidance on how to Police this, which knowing the current crop of fearful vacillating political class, will take at least a month to draft. Which is to our benefit. Here the Police say they prefer to use the old Peelian model of co-operation with the public, which is good. Not like the UK where the idiots are known to kick down doors because someone had the TV on too loud.

Mrs S is fretting, because we have to get out of our current holiday let this weekend and drive our next stop. She’s worried about the travel restrictions and insists I go shopping today and buy lots of canned and dry goods in case we go into level five, which is complete lockdown of the entire fecking country. The ‘experts’ say level five is essential, but for once the politicians kept their nerve, or were more frightened of widespread civil disobedience and said level three, no more.

I’m going to hold back on doing a large shop of canned stuff until Wednesday. By which time our new bank account will be live so I can start moving money around. Once that’s started we’ll be able to get cracking properly. We’ll get the first tranches of capital over and the great work can begin in earnest.

At least the cops over here don’t make unpleasant little rap video’s telling the public that “We’re comin’ to get yer.” Whoever thought that was a good idea needs their head examined. Same for chasing people indoors, when outdoors was the safest place to be.

Overall there’s little of the heavy handed approach here than I’ve seen in the UK. The public are trusted to get on with their lives, and that will be to Ireland’s benefit. It will come out of this with trust in law enforcement more or less intact. And trust is crucial in matters of Policing. Without it you have coppers being run ragged and coming down heavy handed on the very people they are supposed to protect. With the result that more serious crime will skyrocket and public order will be seriously, if not irrevocably impaired.

Might does not make right, it just makes enemies of those authorities that ordinary people need to trust to keep things ticking over nicely. From my reading of Irish history so far, it was the “I say you peasant! Do what you’re bally well told!” attitude on the part of the English that led to constant Irish rebellion and finally the war of independence.

In short this boils down to ‘treat people like shit and they’ll give it right back’. In millions of tiny ways that damage and erode confidence, which was always the plague of management relations in the UK.

On the home front our new house isn’t fully ready for habitation at the moment. Our furniture won’t arrive for three weeks, and there’s decoration to be done. Lampshades, artwork and the like. Then there’s some conversion work to be done on the electronics like the TV and Computers. Replacement power supplies, that sort of thing. Which means Mr Amazon will be a regular caller on our doorstep for a while. Overall, I think we’ve fallen on our feet, which will prove a solid grounding for the next steps forward.

2 thoughts on “Travel tribulations”

  1. You will do very well. You have the right attitude. Buy potatoes. Kept cool and dark the local ones you get at this time of year store for a long time.
    Get a dictionary of local dialect. It is a grand, musical tongue.

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