Folk remedies

Feeling much better today. Sweet repose has returned as the Korean Kitten infestation (Ask Leg-Iron, he started it) has departed. My mind is more settled, with the shadows that conspired to rob me of sleep vanishing with the light of day. To the point where Mrs S noted “Bill, you’re whistling.” Which I was. Just an aimless tune whilst engaged in a mundane task, but it’s a sign I’m feeling much more relaxed.

I put my vastly improved humour down to applying the Sticker family cure for insomnia. Which is one of a collection of remedies for various mild ailments I grew up with. Hot sweetened milk (Honey, sugar, whatever) and 500mg of aspirin or paracetamol at bedtime is the one we applied last night because Mrs S was running a mild malaise and fever and I wasn’t feeling too wonderful either. Like a hot toddy it’s a very nice way of sliding into the arms of Morpheus and makes for a better nights repose, allowing the bodies immune system time to do it’s thing and fight the infection causing the malaise. Which, unless you have a serious illness, is a sensible thing to do rather than immediately run to the quack for the latest thing from the drug companies, which is far too often a sledgehammer to crack a nut. Besides, everything for a purpose.

For most minor health issues I try to avoid bothering our GP, and only make an appointment if I’m feeling really unwell. Then I’ll take my pills without a whimper, because my body won’t have developed any drug resistance through over prescription, so my reasoning is that any medication I’m prescribed will work more effectively and I’ll recover sooner. That and I hate sitting in Doctors waiting rooms, which are always full of depressingly sick people. And the copies of Reader’s Digest and National Geographic are way out of date and just covered in germs. Double-euw.

For example; a recent experiment on the old anti-inflammatory standby Apple cider vinegar showed that regular consumption can reduce ‘harmful’ cholesterol in the blood by up to 13% rather than the 5% generally achieved with regular Statins. Without the risk of liver damage. Hmm. Ma Sticker used to swear by daily doses of Apple Cider Vinegar and Raspberry Cordial to reduce the symptoms of her arthritis, but probably didn’t know (or care) about the whole Cholesterol thing. Some people think it acts as a slimming aid or mild diabetes remedy, go figure. All I know is that it does seem to work as far as mild Arthritis is concerned.

Regarding regular medication, a family anecdote Ma liked to tell from when she had to go to hospital for an eye problem (Cataracts at age 95) where she had the following conversation with the nurse taking her medical history;
Nurse with Clipboard: “Can you tell me what medications you take regularly?”
Ma Sticker: “None.”
Nurse with Clipboard: “I don’t think you understand me dear. I mean’t what pills do you take every day.”
Ma Sticker: “I understood you perfectly the first time. I have no prescription medication. No regular medication.”
Good old Ma. Sharp as a razor right to the last. During most of her long and interesting life I think she rarely took more than the odd antibiotic and generally viewed doctors and hospitals with a healthy scepticism. Until 2012 when her health began to go downhill. The rest of her life she relied on our proven family folk remedies. Apart from a small goitre removal when she was in her eighties, that was it.

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5 thoughts on “Folk remedies”

  1. Yes. I’m aware of the site and it’s content, but so what? That’s someone else’s project which the rest of us have little or nothing to do with. Mr ‘Truth’, if you had bothered to do even the most cursory research would know that Martin Scriblerus is a very loose confederation of bloggers from across the political and social spectrum, not an echo chamber. As for hiding behind ‘silly names’ et tu?

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    1. Well, it wouldn’t be done for Dickie to publish under his real name, now would it? Always the hypocrite.

      I got this crap too. I simply deleted it and banned “Mr Truth”.

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